How Do You Calm An Overactive Mind?

Is it normal to have unwanted thoughts?

Even if you are of sound mind and free of any serious mental health issues, it’s possible to be struck by intrusive thoughts out of nowhere – and this is not something you should feel too concerned about.

If you only have periodic intrusive thoughts and have no urge to act on them, this is completely normal..

What causes an overactive mind?

Hyperactivity is often a symptom of an underlying mental or physical health condition. One of the main conditions associated with hyperactivity is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD causes you to become overactive, inattentive, and impulsive. It’s usually diagnosed at a young age.

How do you stop your mind from racing?

How to stop your mind racingFocus on breathing. Take several deep, careful breaths and focus on counting while inhaling and exhaling. … Try a mantra. You can use a mantra, repeated when necessary, to take your mind off the racing thoughts. … Eliminate stress before bed.

Why is my brain overactive at night?

Excessive thinking at night is one of the most common causes of insomnia. More often than not, it’s a sign of stress. Your mind is on high alert, afraid to fall asleep in case you might forget something important. Something you’re worried you ‘should’ be doing.

How do you stop unwanted thoughts?

7 Tips on How to Stop Intrusive ThoughtsUnderstand Why Intrusive Thoughts Disturb You. … Attend the Intrusive Thoughts. … Don’t Fear the Thoughts. … Take Intrusive Thoughts Less Personally. … Stop Changing Your Behaviors. … Cognitive Therapy for Treatment of OCD Intrusive Thoughts. … Medications that Help with Intrusive Thoughts.

How can I stop thinking at night?

8 Sleep Experts on What to Do When You Can’t Turn Off Your Thoughts at NightDistract yourself with meaningless mental lists. … Try to stay awake instead. … Or just get out of bed. … Write down whatever’s freaking you out. … Get back in bed and do some deep breathing. … Try not to try so hard.More items…•

What is the best medication for severe anxiety and panic attacks?

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Generally safe with a low risk of serious side effects, SSRI antidepressants are typically recommended as the first choice of medications to treat panic attacks.

Do unwanted thoughts go away?

Mundane thoughts leave, but intrusive thoughts last longer and often return. In some cases, intrusive thoughts are the result of an underlying mental health condition, like OCD or PTSD. These thoughts could also be a symptom of another health issue, such as: a brain injury.

How do you treat obsessive thoughts?

Pharmacological treatment can be effective in treating obsessive thoughts. People living with OCD may benefit from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Zoloft, Celexa, Prozac, and Effexor. SSRIs are traditionally used as antidepressants, but they also help target obsessive thoughts.

How do you control your thoughts?

Here’s how to get a grip on it:Be aware. Be prepared. … Name it. When you are stuck in negativity, and feel yourself falling into dark thoughts, stop the cycle by naming it. … Fear is illogical. … Erase and Replace. … Do a reality check. … Present Moment Mindfulness. … It’s your choice.

What is sleep anxiety?

As Winnie Yu, a writer for WebMD noted in her article “Scared to Sleep,” sleep anxiety is a form of performance anxiety. Many people may stress about not getting enough sleep to function, but the stress alone of trying to sleep can cause people to sit awake for hours.

How can I calm my overactive mind at night?

Things to do during the daySchedule a “Worry Time.” … Be active, get lots of sunlight. … Create a “Buffer Zone” of at least 30 minutes before bedtime. … write down any lingering worries/concerns. … get out of bed. … Occupy your mind by telling yourself a story or imagining a scene. … hold up.More items…•

What is overthinking disorder?

You might worry about things like health, money, or family problems. But people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) feel extremely worried or feel nervous about these and other things—even when there is little or no reason to worry about them.